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Hike, Guides, Food, Drink, campsites and more

How difficult is the hike?

The entire 4-day trail hike is 25 miles so the distances traveled each day are not terribly long. Although it is generally accepted that anyone who is accustomed to hiking and camping (i.e. walking for several hours and sleeping in tents) can hike the Inca Trail, the altitude can make hiking these distances feel about twice as difficult as hiking the same distance at sea level. For a detailed description of the hike itself, check out hiking the Classic Inca Trail.

What are the guides like?

Our Tour guides are among the very best and most experienced guides anywhere. They are from the surrounding Cusco/ Sacred Valley area and speak fluent English, in addition to Spanish and the native language of Quechua. Most have 5-10 years of experience leading Inca trail hikes and all have training in the history, spirituality, culture, and ecology of the area. We receive rave reviews on our guides. For more information, check out our Testimonials at: Our Testimonials

What is the food like on the Inca trail?

A cook accompanies every group on the Inca trail. Almost invariably, travelers comment on the delicious menu. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and hearty snacks are provided for your hike. Meals are a mix of local specialties and international favorites. Check out our Inca Trail menu. Vegetarian meals are also available upon request. Other special dietary requests can usually be accommodated as well with sufficient notice.

How is drinking water supplied?

Although there are places to purchase bottled water occasionally along the trail, we recommend that travelers bring their own refillable bottles to limit plastic waste. Water is boiled, treated with iodine, and then filtered with one of our portable filters (Katadyn and PUR commonly used). It is available in the morning to fill your bottles and at every meal.

Which campsites do you use?

Campsites are subject to change depending upon the crowds and the season. We generally try to camp in less trafficked areas so that travelers can enjoy the natural beauty of the Inca trail and minimize environmental impacts. Our typical campsite choices are Wayllabamba, Pacaymayo and Wiñay Wayna or Phuyupatamarca.

What equipment is supplied by the company?

We supply the sleeping tents (4 season tents, 2 people in each 3-people-capacity ten), dining tents, tables, chairs, toilet tents, cooking equipment, water purifiers, air mattresses, and other camping equipment. Our outfitter purchases the highest quality equipment in Peru and older equipment is evaluated and replaced on a regular basis.

What do I need to bring for the hike?

travelers only need to bring their own personal supplies and a sleeping bag + mattress (the mattre is provided by our company). If you do not have a sleeping bag, these can be rented in Cusco for a reasonable rate. Medium-standar backpack to carry sun gear, comfortable trekking clothes, mosquito repellant, hiking shoes, a flashlight, a camera, and 1-2 refillable water bottles are recommended. Rain gear is also recommended during the wet season (December- March) and cold weather gear (warm jacket, thermals, hat and gloves) is recommended for the dry season (especially June- August).

What do I need to carry?

We recommend that travelers carry the items that they will need each day while hiking such as water, snacks, camera and film. Porters will carry all of your other supplies including camping equipment, clothes, sleeping bags, etc. We generally ask travelers to bring only the belongings that they will need for the trail and leave any unneeded luggage at the hotel in Cusco or the Sacred Valley. To prevent porters from becoming overloaded, we ask all travelers to limit their personal belongings to 15 lbs for the hike.

What if I have a medical emergency while hiking the trail?

Guides carry a first aid kit for basic medical problems (traveler's diarrhea, cuts/ scrapes, etc.). They receive Red Cross First Aid and other emergency training every year. Our guides lead over 300 travelers along the Inca trail each year and we have rarely had a traveler unable to complete the hike. In these rare instances when someone has not felt well enough to finish the hike, he/ she has been escorted back to Cusco and generally felt well enough to re-join the group in Machu Picchu via train a few days later. Cusco has the nearest modern medical facilities so travelers with a serious medical emergency would need to be evacuated there. Guides and porters have pre-established evacuation strategies in place should this need occur.

How concerned should I be about the altitude on the hike?

Altitude affects each traveler differently and until you have visited an area with high altitude, it is impossible to predict how your body will react. For this reason, all of our hiking tours include at least 3 days at high altitude with mild activities before travelers begin hiking. This time allows your body to begin acclimatizing (though full acclimatization would take several months) and provides travelers a good indication of how they will feel on the Inca trail (as altitude symptoms are generally the worst on the first day or two at elevation). Commonly, our travelers report mild altitude symptoms such as fatigue, headache, or light-headedness during their first day or two at elevation. Hotels and our porters on the Inca trail have oxygen available for travelers feeling the effects of the elevation.

Severe altitude sickness is rare. In this case, the best treatment is to go down in elevation as soon as possible. We have never had a traveler that had to be evacuated to low altitude. Many severe cases of altitude sickness are the result of a pre-existing condition that is aggravated by the altitude. It is important to ask your doctor whether or not travel to high altitude is advised, especially if you have a pre-existing heart or lung condition such as high blood pressure, asthma, angina, etc. You might also want to ask your doctor about prescription Diamox, a diuretic that many travelers swear by to help them adjust to the altitude more readily. On the Inca trail, you will be hiking in altitudes ranging from

9,000-14,500 ft. The highest camping spot is 12,000 ft.

What about my luggage which I don’t need on the trek?

We suggest you to leave your entire luggage, which you don’t need during the trekking, behind in your hotel. Almost every hotel in Cusco has a safety deposit where you can store your luggage and do not charge for this service when you’ll return to the same hotel after your trek.

how much does the sleeping mat and sleeping bag weigh?

Sleep mat weight = 1 kg

Sleeping bag weight = 2-2.5 kg

I am on my own, will I have someone to share a tent with?

Yes another person of the same sex or if you prefer you can pay a single supplement for a tent just for you. This is US$ 20 (For the entire trek)

Should I hire an extra porter?

If you have not trekked in altitude before we would suggest your organize the extra porter. Unless you have hired an extra porter you will need to carry your own back pack, sleeping bag and the mattress and water for the day. 75% of our travelers hire the extra porter for 8 kilos. If you would like to have a porter carry your things, one can be hired for US$ 50 for every 8 kilos (shared porter, each porter carries 15 Kg plus his gear) You should bring only what you absolutely need/want on the trek, and store the rest of your belongings in Cusco (see the information on our Free Luggage Storage).

Even though if you do hire a porter you will still need a day pack with you so that you can carry such items as your camera, water bottle, snacks (energy bars, dried fruits, nuts, sweets, remember glucose is a big help and imperative in the highs), sunscreen, sun-glasses, a fleece or something warm and a poncho (during the rainy season or cloudy days) and anything else you will need before lunch as the porters do not walk alongside you. You will meet up with your bag at lunch and then it will be waiting for you in your tent at the campsite.

It is best to put everything up to 15 kgs in one bag if you are a couple or 2 for the porter so that you don’t have 2 large backpacks in your tent. Try to under-pack rather than over-pack—if it is overweight at the weigh station, items will have to be removed to reduce the weight.

Extra Porter Includes:

- Entrance to the Inca Trail 41 soles

- Bus Ticket Cusco to Km 82 (20 soles)

- Food while on the Trek (30 soles)

- Salary of the Porter for the Entire 4 days (45 soles a day)180 soles total.